Core Conversations: Fall 2020

Join members of the ACTC Board this Fall for live conversations on Zoom about some of our favorite core texts.

Annual Conference

ACTC Conferences may be the most stimulating conference you attend all year – at least that is what repeatAnnual Conference Blurbed surveys of conference attendees tell us.

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About ACTC

The Association for Core Texts and Courses brings together colleges and universities that promote the integrated and common study of world classics and other texts of major cultural significance.

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Liberal Arts Institute

The ACTC Liberal Arts Institute provides help to faculty and administrators in the development of core programs and baccalaureate degree programs.

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Publications

ACTC publishes selected, peer-reviewed proceedings from papers that have been submitted after the conference.
ACTC is a truly interdisciplinary organization and we have accepted papers from all branches of higher learning.

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Core Conversations

Fall 2020

Recorded remarks and Live Zoom Conversations about core texts with members of the ACTC Board.

We may not be able to meet together right now, but we can still have important conversations about great texts. Join us!

How do Core Conversations work?

Watch the video of our speaker's opening remarks.

(Re)read the text so you're ready to ask good, hard questions.

Sign onto Zoom at the appointed time. Everyone is welcome!

Our Schedule

October 16 Joshua Parens on Averroes

Click HERE for a video of Prof. Parens's opening remarks

Click HERE for excerpts from Averroes' Commentary on Plato's Republic

Click HERE to join the live zoom conversation with Prof. Parens on Oct. 16.

November 13 Page Laws on Margaret Walker

December 11 Emma Cohen de Lara on Plato

Core Conversations Archives

Roosevelt Montás on Frederick Douglass, September 2020

Click HERE for a video of Prof. Montás's opening remarks.

Click HERE to watch our Q&A (recorded live on September 18th)

Click HERE for a PDF of Frederick Douglass's "What to the Slave . . . " speech.